Wolff & Sonderhouse, LLP
Put Our Experience To Work For You
262-232-6699
Available 7 Days a Week/ 24 Hours a Day
Practice Areas Menu

theft & property crimes Archives

Were you accused of arson in Wisconsin?

When a house or business burns down, police will investigate the incident to determine what went wrong. Even if it was a complete accident, police will sometimes accuse a homeowner or business owner of setting a piece of property on fire just to collect the insurance money. In criminal law, this crime is not only referred to as insurance fraud, but it's also called "arson."

What are the penalties for fraudulent credit card use?

The state of Wisconsin has enacted numerous laws that govern the use of credit cards. It's also developed criminal statutes with associated penalties for the fraudulent use of credit cards. If you've been accused of any type of credit card fraud, it's important to know what the potential penalties are if you're convicted.

An overview of organized retail crime

Organized retail crime (or “ORC”) is a type of crime that involves multiple actors. It appears that some people have realized that certain retail items are extremely valuable when they are sold on the street and have organized their efforts to hit stores in a coordinated fashion to maximize their bang for the criminal buck. These organizations are relatively new and only recently began attracting media attention. This post will go over ORCs and the potential consequences for people who are caught participating in them.

Facing shoplifting charges

The act of taking an item in a concealed manner and leaving without paying is called shoplifting. Although it is a larceny, it is considered a theft of someone else's property. Although taking something from a store is considered as shoplifting, there are some other cases that may also lead to shoplifting charges. Any scenario in which you take off with something without paying will be considered shoplifting under the law.

The difference between petty theft and grand theft

There are people all over who make the decision to commit a crime. While some are able to get away with the wrong they have done, not all of them can say they have been successful. Being charged with a theft or property crime like shoplifting or burglary can have a negative effect on your life. However, depending on how the crime is classified, the consequences may not be as harsh as some people believe.

Dealing with mortgage fraud charges

Mortgage fraud generally refers to illegal schemes and misrepresentation of data on mortgage documents. Lying on the forms or impersonating someone else on the forms could result in severe penalties. Mortgage fraud can be carried out for housing purposes or monetary purposes. The sentencing depends on what type of mortgage fraud has been committed.

Dealing with identity theft charges

The act of obtaining someone's identity or personal information through deceptive means is considered as identity theft. In most identity theft cases, this information is used for personal financial gain. A person's personal and economic data can be used for your own benefit in several ways, and all states have statutes to protect their citizens against identity theft.

Why plead not guilty in an embezzlement case? P.2

In our last post, we began looking at a case in which a Wisconsin woman has been charged with embezzling nearly $100,000 during her employment at an Oak Creek Lutheran Church. Earlier this month, she pleaded not guilty to the embezzlement charges. As we said last time, there are a variety of reasons why a defendant might choose to plead not guilty in a criminal case.

Why plead not guilty in an embezzlement case? P.1

Last month, a Wisconsin woman who former worked at a Lutheran Church in Oak Creek was charged with embezzling almost $100,000 in her employment there. The woman had reportedly worked at the church in a variety of capacities over a four-year period of time, including as an administrative assistant and acting director through March of this year. In this capacity, she was given access to a debt card and bank account privileges for financial management of the church.

Back to Top