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Waukesha County criminal defense attorney for battery charges

Crimes of violence are taken rather seriously in the state of Wisconsin. Even crimes like battery, which is sometimes less serious than other violent crimes, are charged and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Being convicted of battery can be a serious crime, especially when it is charged as a felony. Not all battery crimes are charged as felonies. In general, battery is charged as a Class A misdemeanor, which comes with a potential sentence of up to nine months in jail and up to $10,000 in fines. In many cases, battery crimes are charged as various felonies, which can vary in severity. 

“Bodily Harm” Versus “Great Bodily Harm”

One of the easiest ways your battery charge can be elevated from a misdemeanor to a felony is by the amount of damage that is inflicted upon the victim and the perpetrator’s intent. Wisconsin law states that a misdemeanor battery crime is characterized by a person causing “bodily harm.” However, if a person is found to have inflicted “substantial bodily harm,” the charge is elevated to a Class I felony with a potential sentence of up to 3.5 years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines. Likewise, a person can be charged with a Class H or Class E felony if they caused “great bodily harm” and they intended to cause some sort of harm. Class H felonies come with up to six years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines, while Class E felonies come with up to 15 years in prison with up to $50,000 in fines.

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Waukesha County criminal defense attorney OWI

In most states, driving or operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol is strictly forbidden and results in a criminal charge. Wisconsin, however, is unique in the fact that it is the only state to still classify a first-offense OWI as a driving offense, rather than a criminal offense. Instead of jail time as a punishment, a first-time OWI offender typically only faces around $735 in fines, a six- to nine-month driver’s license revocation, and a potential requirement for an ignition interlock device (IID) on their vehicles. However, charges can escalate quickly in OWI cases. Under certain circumstances, operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI) can result in felony charges.

Fourth or Greater OWI Offense

If the OWI offense is your fourth or greater OWI offense, it will automatically be charged as a felony offense. A fourth OWI is charged as a Class H felony, which carries a possible jail sentence of 60 days to six years, a two- to three-year driver’s license revocation, and an IID requirement for vehicles. Charges for further offenses can range from Class G felonies to Class E felonies, for 10th or greater offenses.

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Oconomowoc criminal defense attorney homicide

Homicide is one of the most serious and violent crimes with which you can be charged, especially if you are facing intentional homicide charges. In the state of Wisconsin, first-degree intentional homicide can result in a mandatory life prison sentence, while attempted first-degree homicide could carry a prison sentence that lasts for decades. This is what a North Dakota man is facing after he was apprehended recently in connection with the shootings of two Wisconsin law enforcement officers.  

Man Wanted for Attempted Homicide in North Dakota, Shoots Cops in Wisconsin

A manhunt was underway in early November in Waukesha County as police searched for a 23-year-old North Dakota man wanted for shooting two Wisconsin police officers. The incident occurred after two officers responded to a call about a car crash. During the stop, shots were exchanged and the two officers were hit, both suffering non-life-threatening injuries, while the 23-year-old fled on foot. The suspect is also wanted by police in Fargo, ND for an attempted homicide incident.

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Brookfield theft defense attorney

Shoplifting is not an uncommon crime in Wisconsin, even though the penalties for shoplifting charges can be severe in some situations. There are many different actions that could be considered shoplifting or retail theft under Wisconsin law. These could range from taking a shirt without paying for it to switching the price tags on an item. Depending on the value of the items that were taken, an alleged offender could face anywhere from a misdemeanor charge to a felony charge. Retail theft laws can be complicated, which is why an experienced criminal defense lawyer can help build a solid defense against such charges.

Types of Shoplifting

Shoplifting, which is also known as retail theft, consists of more than just stealing an item from the store. According to Wisconsin’s criminal statutes, a person is guilty of retail theft when he or she intends to permanently deprive the retailer of the value of the merchandise or product. This crime can also include the following actions:

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Milwaukee assault and battery defense attorney

Being accused of any crime is a serious matter, but being accused of a violent offense often has much more significant consequences. Violent crimes tend to carry stiffer penalties than others. In most cases, these crimes carry the possibility of many different punishments, such as jail time, fines, probation, and a permanent criminal record. If you have been accused of committing assault and/or battery in Wisconsin, it can have a lasting impact on your personal and professional life. Therefore, it is crucial to speak to a criminal defense lawyer who can help build a strong defense on your behalf.

What Is Assault?

In a general sense, an assault occurs when an individual causes another person to reasonably fear bodily harm. Physical contact does not have to be made for assault charges to apply in Wisconsin. In most cases, however, the act also involves a battery offense, which is the charge that prosecutors typically focus on.

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