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Waukesha, WI criminal defense attorney weapons charges

When our government was created, the Founding Fathers’ intention was to limit the amount of power that any one person or group of people could have, which is why there are certain things that the federal government does not regulate, such as licensing drivers or certain aspects of gun ownership. While there are federal gun laws that citizens of all states must abide by, each state is also responsible for creating and enforcing its own firearm regulations. The state of Wisconsin tends to be more of a firearm-friendly state and has somewhat less strict laws than other states. However, violating firearm possession laws can lead to serious consequences if you find yourself facing criminal charges.

Open Carry Laws and Limitations

All states are different when it comes to carrying firearms in public. Some states may require you to obtain a permit simply just to purchase and/or carry your firearm. Like other states, Wisconsin is an open carry state, meaning anyone who is over the age of 18 and is legally permitted to possess a firearm can carry one in public as long as it is not concealed. There are limitations to that rule, however. You are prohibited from openly carrying a firearm in the following places in Wisconsin:

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Oconomowoc criminal defense attorney OWI with a minor passenger

The state of Wisconsin is one of the few states that still treat the first-time charge for operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI) as a moving violation rather than a crime. However, circumstances significantly change if a person has a minor who is under the age of 16 in the vehicle at the time the OWI is committed. In the past couple of years, Wisconsin lawmakers have made changes to some of the state’s drunk driving laws, with updated penalties for minor passengers being one of them. In many cases, offenders could see their criminal penalties as much as double if they were driving under the influence with a minor in the vehicle.

First and Second OWI With No Prior Offense

For a typical first or second OWI charge with no prior OWI charges in the preceding 10 years, an offender typically would face up to a $300 fine, up to a nine-month license suspension, and no jail time. However, if a minor was in the vehicle when the offense was committed, he or she could face between $350 and $1,100 in fines, a 12-18-month license suspension, and up to six months in jail.

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New Berlin criminal defense attorney juvenile crime

As a parent, one of the worst phone calls you could receive is one from your child stating that he or she has gotten into trouble with the law. Being arrested and charged with a criminal offense is a serious situation, regardless of whether or not you are an adult or a child. If your minor has been arrested or has had a run-in with the law, you may be wondering if he or she will be tried as an adult or as a child. In many cases, a juvenile will be tried and sentenced through the juvenile justice system, which functions slightly differently than the adult criminal justice system. In some cases, however, a juvenile may be tried in adult court for certain crimes in Wisconsin.

17-Year-Olds Are Considered Adults

Wisconsin is still among the few states that always consider juveniles who are at least 17 years old to be “adults.” This means that if a 17-year-old is arrested and charged with a crime, his or her case automatically is sent to adult court, not juvenile court. However, those who were 15 or 16 at the time of the offense may be tried either as a juvenile or an adult. This decision is up to the court’s discretion and mainly depends on the nature of the offense and the possibility for rehabilitation.

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Oconomowoc BUI defense attorney

After several long months of winter weather, summer has finally arrived in Wisconsin. Even though this summer might look a little different than what we are used to, it is safe to assume that most people will attempt to continue with summertime activities, such as boating. In Wisconsin, boating is a favorite pastime for many. What some may not realize, however, is that boats fall under many of the same laws that other motor vehicles do -- especially when it comes to operating them while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Therefore, it is important to understand the legal penalties for this type of criminal offense.

Dangers of Alcohol and Boating

Alcohol alters your perceptions of the world around you, which is why it is so dangerous to drive while under the influence. Boating is no exception. Alcohol is notorious for delaying reaction time and causing balance issues, both of which can already be exacerbated on a boat because of the vibrations and waves in the water. Drugs or alcohol can also impair your vision and depth perception, which is critical when navigating any type of watercraft. 

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Brookfield theft defense attorney

Shoplifting is not an uncommon crime in Wisconsin, even though the penalties for shoplifting charges can be severe in some situations. There are many different actions that could be considered shoplifting or retail theft under Wisconsin law. These could range from taking a shirt without paying for it to switching the price tags on an item. Depending on the value of the items that were taken, an alleged offender could face anywhere from a misdemeanor charge to a felony charge. Retail theft laws can be complicated, which is why an experienced criminal defense lawyer can help build a solid defense against such charges.

Types of Shoplifting

Shoplifting, which is also known as retail theft, consists of more than just stealing an item from the store. According to Wisconsin’s criminal statutes, a person is guilty of retail theft when he or she intends to permanently deprive the retailer of the value of the merchandise or product. This crime can also include the following actions:

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